Sit-In for Civil Rights in Richmond

By New Year’s Day of 1960, Richmond remained a segregated city. Most aspects of daily life for African Americans, from education to entertainment to shopping,...

A Snowy Day (or Three)

On February 11, 1899, at approximately three o’clock in the afternoon, it started snowing in Richmond.  And it did not stop for fifty-five hours....

Dancing in the Streets

In 1929, a fantastic Richmond holiday tradition was born: the Christmas Toy Parade. Every year, just after Thanksgiving, crowds gathered on Broad Street to watch...

Community in Transition

In 1871, lines were drawn around a new voting ward. Before the Emancipation, the area had been home to German, Italian, and Jewish immigrants,...

A Stately Richmond Residence

In 1916, the famous New York architect, John Russell Pope, designed one of the largest private residences ever built in Richmond. On Monument Avenue, the...

Grandeur in Ruins

In 1892, Major Lewis Günter decided to build the finest hotel in America, in Richmond.  Some would say he succeeded, considering its impressive guest list,...

One Large Step for Women’s Rights

On November 20, 1909, the Equal Suffrage League of Virginia voted itself into existence. It was the first women’s voting rights organization in Richmond...

Honoring Those Who Served

Veterans Day holds significant meaning in our family. My father was in the Air Force, and my grandfather served in the Army during World...

Guess Who’s Coming with Dinner?

In 1646, two now-Virginia tribes signed a peace treaty with the British powers, ending the Third Anglo-Powhatan War. With this, the first reservations (the...

So-Long-Summer Getaway

As summer winds down, you might be like me – longing for one last break before it’s back to hectic after-school schedules, hours of...